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Foods Not To Give To Your Dog

While it is tempting to share your food with your fury fmily member, you should be aware that many of the human foods are poisonouas for dogs. You should avoid ordering foods for your dog from the below menu.

APPETIZERS

Baby Food – Many people try to give baby foods especially to pups when they are not feeling well. Baby foods are not bad in general. However, you should make sure the baby food you are giving does not contain any onion powder. Also, baby foods do not contain all the necessary nutrients for a healthy dog.

Chewing Gum – Most chewing gum doghint¬†¬† contains a sugar called Xylitol which has no effects on humans. However, it can cause a surge of insulin in dogs that drops a dog’s blood sugar to dangerous level. If your dog eats large amount of gums, it can damage liver, kidney or worse.

Candy – Many of the candies also contain Xylitol, the same type of sugar as Chewing gum. So, keep candies and chewing gums away from the reach of your dogs and puppies.

Chocolate – Chocolates are considered poisonous for dogs. Chocolates contain caffeine and theobromine which can be toxic for your dog. Chocolates can cause panting, vomiting, and diarrhea, and damage your dog’s heart and nervous systems.

Corn on the cob – Dogs can eat Corn, but not the cob. Most dogs cannot digest cob easily, which can cause intestinal obstruction, a very serious and possibly fatal medical condition if not treated immediately.

Macadamia Nuts – Macadamia nuts also known as Australia Nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs.

Mushrooms – Mushrooms are tricky. While some types of Mushrooms are fine, others can be toxic for dogs. Some types of mushrooms can cause serious stomach issues for dogs. As a cautious dog owner, you should try to avoid giving mushrooms to your dog.

Tobacco – Never give tobacco to your dog. The effects of nicotine on dogs are much more worse than humans. The toxic level of nicotine in dogs is 5 milligrams of nicotine per pound of body weight. In dogs, 10 mg/kg is potentially lethal.

Cooking dough – Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue.

Rotten food -Spoiled food have mold and other bacteria which can cause serious damage to your dog’s health.

MAIN ENTRIES

Cooked Bones – While raw bones are beneficial for your dog’s teeth, cooked bones can be dangerous for your pup. Cooked bones are more brittle, which means it is highly likely they might splinter and cause internal injury to your dog.

Cat Food – A little cat food eaten by your dog may not be an issue. However, you feed cat food regularly to your dog, it can cause some health issues. Cat foods usually have higher level of protein and fat which are not healthy for dogs.

Fat Trimmings – Meat fat trimmings, cooked or raw can cause pancreatitis in dogs.

Liver – Feeding liver occasionally might be OK, but do not feed too much liver to your dog. Excessive consumption of liver can adversely affect your dog’s muscles and bones.

Yeast – As mentioned earlier, too much of yeast could rupture your dog’s stomach and intestines.

Dairy Products – Some dogs would be fine with dairy products. However, dogs generally have relatively poor levels of tolerance to lactose which is found in milk. As a result, it can cause diarrhea and other digestive issues.

DRINKS

Alcohol – You should not even let your dog taste any kind of alcohol, let alone consume it in large quantity. The main ingredients used in beer, wine, and other alcoholic beverages are toxics and dangerous for dogs. Alcohol can cause poor breathing, abnormal acidity, intoxication, lack of coordination and even coma and/or death for a dog.

 

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